Me lookin at you and you lookin at me: Staging Social Network Advertising

“Just as i thought it was goin alright I found out how wrong when i thought i was right, Its always the same its just a shame that’s all

I could say day, and you’d say night, Tell me its black when i know that’s its white Its always the same its just a shame that’s all!”

For those of us who remember the mid-eighties and in particular Phil Collins’ run of hits the above lyrics will be familiar.

The tie-in to today’s segment is that talking does not mean connecting. Sending out a message does not mean it is being received.

When I first viewed David Cushman’s SlideShare presentation titled “Why Traditional Ad Models will not work in social networks (and what will…),” I was immediately caught by both the succinctness of the message (it is only 10 slides long) and the significance of its meaning. A meaning, which given the fact that I had just published a series of articles on the viability of social media models, took on added significance based on the prediction of industry veteran J. William Grimes that the daily newspaper would no longer be in existence in 5 years.

Unlike traditional advertising in which the number of eyeballs looking toward what Cushman referred to as a stage is the critical point of connection, social networking as the refrain from the Collins song goes is “Me lookin at you and you lookin at me.”

The trouble is that most companies whether large or small do not really grasp what this direct one-to-one connection means and what it really involves . . . “Turnin me on, turnin me off” is more often that not the end result.

Like it or not, social networking has redefined how we interact and do business. Joining me to talk about the dramatic and collective paradigm shift associated with conversational or relational marketing is none other than David Cushman himself.

You will want to tune in to this show . . . That’s All! Use the On-Demand Player below:

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Here of course is the PowerPoint to which I had referred:

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